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Sources: Diamonds

Thesis Gems - Pink Diamond

We love to use diamonds that are not newly mined- vintage (reclaimed) or true antique diamonds. We also use vintage diamonds (post 1940's) that are chipped, or scratched, and then re-cut. We source our antique and vintage diamonds from Perpetuum Jewels and  Poli Trading Company. Perpetuum Jewels is certified by SCS Global Services as a responsible source and for 100% Post-Consumer Recycled Gemstones. This is a more environmentally sustainable alternative to newly-mined stones. We also use Canadian diamonds; mined in the Canadian North under strict standards established by the Canadian Code of Conduct and the Government of the Northwest Territories. These standards work to protect the Arctic environment, mine workers, and local employees.

Interview with Jared Holstein, owner of Perpetuum Jewels- April 2019

 

What is your favorite gemstone? Why?

You’re not allowed to pick a favorite child! Favorite children: Spinel (a true cobalt is my Eleanor), corundum, tourmaline. Why do I love them? The heart wants what it wants, I tend to make the most irrational purchases of these juicy, metallic crystals.

Proudest moment in the industry?

Is yet to come! When our conversations around jewelry material selection is limited to discussing which are doing the most good rather than the least harm.

What is the best investment in jewelry?

If we are speaking of investment in happiness, jewelry is portable power. The best investments are those pieces that speak, move you and bring you joy, that you imbue with emotion or importance, and importantly, will stand the test of time so that they’ll bring others happiness as well.

What is ethical jewelry?

That depends on your definition of ethical; to me, a piece of ethical jewelry can result from endeavoring (with a curious mind, insistent voice and a general vengeance) to create positive impacts and mitigate negative impacts at every step in the journey of its creation, from component material extraction through processing, fabrication and sale.

If you had $20,000 to spend from Thesis G&J, what would you buy?

 I love the secret flash ring, so a four-finger first full of beauty?

Are your feet the same size? Definitively not, and moving sideways.

What food would you not, under any circumstances, eat?

Dog, which I know is slightly irrational and culturally relative, but they are among the best people I know.

 

 

 

 

Interview with Randy Poli, owner of Poli Trading Company- November 2019

What is your favorite gemstone? Why?

My favorite gemstone continues to be a diamond. I have an appreciation for all gems, but I am truly drawn to the variety of shapes, colors and styles of cutting that diamonds come in. Given my background and appreciation for antique and vintage jewelry, I am particularly interested in seeing how diamond cutting has evolved over time. I find myself particularly drawn to Georgian stones with their muted brilliance and flat surfaces (Georgian rose cuts as well are a particular favorite). I see these stones as being very current in terms of modern luxury - perfect in that they are all different, each stone having it’s own bespoke, artisan feel. Moving along to more modern cutting, it has become a particular passion of mine to source stones very uniquely shaped step cuts (kites, shields, lozenges, hexagons). These stones showcase the most artistic side of the modern diamond cutting craft with a nod to the creativity of the Deco era, but harnessing modern technology to improve upon many of those shapes from years past.

Proudest moment in the industry?

I’m not one to seek out much in terms of personal accolades so I would say my proudest moment in the jewelry business was being invited to and participating in the first Gem Geneve Fair as an exhibitor. It was an honor to be showcasing alongside many of the most prestigious suppliers and discerning buyers in the world. It was really a reflection point for me seeing my career evolve from very humble and uncertain beginnings.

What is the best investment in jewelry?

I am a firm believer that rarity and quality are what truly drives value so buying something that is truly beautiful and rare would be the investment. I think this beauty can come in the form a rare antique diamond, a rare colored diamond or precious gemstone, or a piece of jewelry from a master maker either antique or modern. Buying any of these items for good value (not paying retail) is always a great investment because these types of items cannot truly be replaced.

What is ethical jewelry?

I am still wading into the waters of ethical sourcing, and am by no means an expert; however, I feel that ethical sourcing should be striving to find and sell goods that don’t contribute to exploitation of indigenous peoples or take an unnecessary toll on the environment. Ethical sourcing should be able to be verified via evidence (dealer being able to tell you specifically where/how a stone was acquired) or trust that the dealer you are working with is being truthful in their description of provenance. My preference in ethically sourced goods is buying reclaimed or 2nd hand pieces as I can truly see and feel the piece to verify it’s history. I know there are several mines and regions that tout there stones as ethically sourced; however, the disconnect from being so far downstream in the production cycle (only seeing the finished, polished gem) makes it hard to truly trust the merits of the process more than buying something 2nd hand.

If you had $20,000 to spend from Thesis G&J, what would you buy?

Haha! I would probably buy back some of the gems Thesis has cherry picked from my collection! I would prefer to buy them after they have been designed for and found their forever home in a piece of bespoke jewelry. There’s an antique champagne hexagonal diamond that has been singing to me of late.

 Poli Trading Company

GIA Guide to diamond quality

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